Daily Archives: March 5, 2015

Actor Harrison Ford injured in small plane crash near Los Angeles: report

An airplane sits after crash landing at Penmar Golf Course in Venice California March 5, 2015. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson


(Reuters) – Actor Harrison Ford was injured on Thursday in the crash of a small airplane outside Los Angeles, celebrity website TMZ reported.

Reuters could not immediately confirm the report on TMZ, which said that Ford, 72, suffered multiple gashes to his head and was taken to a nearby hospital for treatment.

“We can confirm that there was a plane crash and the male occupant was a 65-70 years old man. He was transported to a local hospital in stable condition,” Los Angeles Police Department spokeswoman Officer Nuria Vanegas said.

“The incident was reported at 2:25 p.m., it was mechanical failure of plane, that’s what caused the accident,” Vanegas said.

Ford, best known for his roles in such blockbuster films as Star Wars and Raiders of the Lost Ark, is a longtime aviation enthusiast.

(Reporting by Piya Sinha-Roy and Dan Whitcomb; Editing by Cynthia Johnston and Sandra Maler)


Source: Newsjyoti Entertainment

U.S. investor sues OAS, Brazil builder tied to Petrobras scandal

(Reuters) – U.S. investment firm Huxley
Capital Corp filed a lawsuit on Thursday in a New York court
against Brazilian construction group OAS SA, alleging the
debt-ladden company is hiding assets from creditors at two
valuable subsidiaries.

The defendants in the lawsuit, filed in Manhattan federal
court, are OAS and subsidiaries Construtora OAS SA, OAS
Investimentos SA, OAS Infraestrutura SA and OAS Engenharia e
Construção SA, court documents showed.

Huxley alleged that OAS transferred assets from Construtora
OAS and OAS Investimentos to protect them from bondholders.
Huxley owns debt issued by two of the subsidiaries, which he
said might prove unable to make good on their obligations
because of the asset transfers.

The transfers occurred as OAS plunged into “disarray” after
the company was named in a corruption probe in Brazil that
subsequently cut access to financing, the lawsuit said. An
executive at a public relations firm representing OAS did not
have an immediate comment.

The New York lawsuit comes as OAS struggles with the impact
of a graft and money-laundering scandal afflicting key client
Petrobas (Petróleo Brasileiro SA ), which has cut
OAS’s revenue flow and access to financing.

Some of Brazil’s largest civil construction companies are
facing increased scrutiny and limited access to credit markets
after federal prosecutors found that executives at Petrobras
negotiated bribes in exchange for building, leasing and other
contracts.

In January, a Brazilian judge in São Paulo ordered the
seizure of some the shares that OAS SA holds in
infrastructure company Investimentos e Participações em
Infraestrutura SA, or Invepar. The ruling came at the behest of
holders of 160 million reais ($53 million) in local notes.

Early this year, OAS failed to pay interest on $400 million
of global bonds and on 100 million reais of debt, and bankers
are speculating that a sale of the stake in Invepar could help
OAS raise cash to honor some obligations. OAS controls a 25
percent stake in Invepar through unit OAS Infraestrutura.

(Reporting by Guillermo Parra-Bernal; Editing by Steve
Orlofsky)


Source: Newsjyoti Bankruptcy News

Inspector testing positive for deadly bacteria didn't get it at Louisiana lab: CDC

<span class="articleLocatio

n”>(Reuters) – A federal investigator who tested positive for a deadly bacteria that affected five monkeys at a Louisiana primate research facility did not contact it while she was at the lab, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said on Thursday.

The worker likely became exposed to the bacteria, Burkholderia pseudomallei, during previous travels to parts of the world where the bacteria is endemic, Jason McDonald, a spokesman at the CDC, told Reuters.

Five monkeys at the high-security Tulane National Primate Research Center near New Orleans were accidentally infected with or exposed to the bacteria late last year.

Three of them had to be euthanized. The other two showed antibodies that indicated they had been exposed but never had any symptoms, Tulane officials said.

The rhesus macaque monkeys had been housed in the veterinary clinic of the center, about 40 miles north of New Orleans. Research on the bacteria, which was being done to find a vaccine, has been halted while investigators determine how the bacteria escaped from its confines in the lab, Tulane spokesman Mike Strecker said.

The clinic, which has been decontaminated, is believed to be where the monkeys contacted the bacteria while they were being treated for routine illnesses and injuries suffered in their breeding colony.

Lab workers, veterinary staff and other personnel have tested negative for the bacteria, CDC officials said earlier this week.

The bacteria can cause a disease called melioidosis in both humans and animals. It has a wide range of symptoms that can be confused with other diseases like tuberculosis or pneumonia, according to the CDC.

In late January, the investigator with the U.S. Department of Agriculture became sick after having visited the center, and an antibody test indicated she had been exposed to the bacteria, Strecker said.

But testing this week showed her antibody levels had not grown since her visit to the clinic, MacDonald said. That indicated the exposure was an old one, he said, and occurred before her investigation at the center.

CDC officials did not identify the country in which the investigator had been traveling, but said the bacteria was endemic in regions including Southeast Asia and Australia.

(Reporting by Karen Brooks in Austin, Texas; Editing by Peter Cooney)


Source: Newsjyoti Health

Many in U.S. live too far from advanced stroke care

<span class="articleLocatio

n”>(Reuters Health) – Many Americans would not have quick access to the best healthcare options during a stroke, even under the most ideal circumstances, according to a new computer model.

In a hypothetical model, if each state had up to 20 hospitals providing the best possible care for people having strokes – which is not the current reality – more than a third of Americans would still be more than a 60-minute ambulance ride away from one of those medical centers.

Using a helicopter or other air transportation would improve that number but still leave many Americans more than an hour away from the nearest center, the study found.

“There are effective treatments for stroke, but they are time sensitive,” said lead author Dr. Michael Mullen. “The faster a patient is treated, the more likely they are to be eligible for acute stroke therapies and the more effective those therapies will be.”

Timely transport to a qualified medical center is especially important with recent evidence supporting a new method to clear stroke-causing blood clots from the brain, said Mullen, a neurologist from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, in an email to Reuters Health.

That procedure, he said, “is resource intensive and will not be available in all hospitals.”

Starting in 2003, medical centers could be certified as primary stroke centers, making them go-to hospitals for stroke patients. Starting in 2012, they could also be certified as comprehensive stroke centers to show they deliver the most advanced stroke care.

For the new study, the researchers used a computer model to show which primary stroke centers should be upgraded to comprehensive centers to optimize access for as many Americans as possible.

By the end of 2010, there were 811 primary stroke centers that were potential candidates for upgrade, the researchers report in the journal Neurology.

Each state had between 0 and 96 primary stroke centers, and only about 66 percent of Americans were within a one-hour ride to one of those centers, they found.

Under what the researchers consider a best-case scenario, converting up to 20 of those hospitals in strategic locations in each state would give about 63 percent of Americans access to a comprehensive stroke center within an hour drive.

By adding air transportation as an option to those centers, 86 percent of Americans would be an hour away from one of the comprehensive stroke centers.

Even so, access would vary considerably by state. Everyone in most Northeastern states would have access to a comprehensive stroke center by ground or air within 60 minutes, compared to only about 15 percent of people in Wyoming.

“I think that the primary take-away is that even under optimal circumstances Comprehensive Stroke Centers may not be rapidly accessible to everyone in the population and there will likely be significant geographic variability in access to these centers,” Mullen said.

The researchers caution that comprehensive stroke centers are new and still need to show that they deliver better care than traditional hospitals.

One neurologist not involved with the study said the current approach to stroke care has elements in common with approaches used in trauma care and for heart attacks.

For heart attacks, Dr. David Miller said, many hospitals can provide initial care and then transfer patients to other hospitals – but trauma patients are usually taken directly to regional centers that provide very advanced care.

“Stroke is in-between,” said Miller, director of the comprehensive stroke center at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida.

As of now, he said, the most important thing is for people experiencing the symptoms of stroke to get medical attention and notify 911.

“If it’s a small emergency room that’s a block away, you get them there,” Miller said.

The American Stroke Association recommends FAST to identify the symptoms of a stroke: Face drooping, Arm weakness, Speech difficulty, Time to call 911.

SOURCE: bit.ly/17Wc79e and bit.ly/17Wc9Ow Neurology, online March 4, 2015.


Source: Newsjyoti Health

Johnson & Johnson ordered to pay $5.7 million in California mesh trial

<span class="articleLocatio

n”>(Reuters) – A California jury on Thursday ordered Johnson & Johnson’s Ethicon Inc unit to pay $5.7 million in the first trial over injuries blamed on the TVT Abbrevo, one of numerous transvaginal mesh products that are the subject of thousands of lawsuits.

Following more than three days of deliberations in Kern County, California, jurors found Ethicon liable for problems with the TVT Abbrevo’s design and for failing to warn about its risks, according to a lawyer for plaintiff Coleen Perry.

Perry was awarded $700,000 in compensatory damages and an additional $5 million in punitive damages after jurors in the Bakersfield court found Ethicon’s conduct amounted to “malice,” her lawyer said.

The verdict is the fourth win for plaintiffs suing Ethicon over transvaginal mesh. More than 36,000 lawsuits have been filed against Ethicon in state and federal courts over the devices, which are used to treat stress urinary incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse.

The Abbrevo, one of Ethicon’s newer models of mesh products, was cleared for sale by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 2010 to treat stress urinary incontinence. Perry, who was implanted with it in 2011, said she began experiencing a “pulling-type” pain almost immediately after surgery.

Perry said the mesh began to erode in her body, causing pain that she said she expects to last the rest of her life, according to testimony Reuters saw on Courtroom View Network.

Ethicon’s lawyers said the product was thoroughly vetted before it hit the market and that doctors considered the mesh used in the Abbrevo to be the “gold standard” for incontinence treatment.

Peter de la Cerda, a lawyer for Perry, said the verdict sent a “clear message to Ethicon” about its “improper conduct in designing and marketing the Abbrevo.”

Ethicon spokesman Matthew Johnson said the company believed it has strong grounds for appeal. Ethicon stands behind the safety and effectiveness of the Abbrevo, as well as its development and marketing, he added.

Ethicon won one trial over mesh in federal court in West Virginia, where another trial over its mesh products started on Monday.

Ethicon, Boston Scientific Corp and C.R. Bard are among seven companies facing more than 70,000 mesh injury lawsuits in federal court and thousands of additional cases in state courts.

The case is Perry et al v. Luu et al, Superior Court of the State of California, Kern County, No. 5-1500-CV-279123.

(Reporting by Jessica Dye in New York; editing by Chris Reese, Alexia Garamfalvi and Lisa Von Ahn)


Source: Newsjyoti Health

'Hang On Sloopy,' you're almost legal: Ohio lawmakers

Fri Mar 6, 2015 2:28am IST

<span class="focusParagraph articleLocation”>(Reuters) – The 1960s hit “Hang On Sloopy” is a step closer to becoming Ohio’s official state rock song.

A bill granting the song legal status passed the state House of Representatives on Wednesday and will be assigned to a Senate committee this week or next, a spokesman for co-sponsor state Representative Michael Stinziano said on Thursday.

Why pick “Hang On Sloopy,” which doesn’t even mention the Buckeye State in its tale of a girl who lives in a “very bad side of town?” The song was a major hit in 1965 for The McCoys, of Dayton, Ohio.

It was written about Steubenville, Ohio, singer Dorothy Sloop, who sometimes used the stage name “Sloopy,” according to Stinziano’s office.

The song has become the informal anthem for Ohio State University football.

“It’s just sort of ingrained in Ohio culture,” said Joseph Garrity, a spokesman for Stinziano.

Ohio lawmakers including Stinziano’s father, former Representative Mike Stinziano, sponsored a resolution in 1985 that designated “Hang On Sloopy” the state’s official rock song.

The resolution was adopted, but the song was never properly placed in Ohio law along with other state designations, Stinziano’s office said.

“Hang On Sloopy” has bipartisan support in the swing state.

(Reporting by Mary Wisniewski; Editing by Doina Chiacu)

Source: Newsjyoti India Lifestyle

Wisconsin Assembly debate begins on right-to-work bill

A crowd of about 200 people and union members gather in frigid temperatures in downtown Milwaukee, Wisconsin February 23, 2015. REUTERS/Brendan O'Brien

A crowd of about 200 people and union members gather in frigid temperatures in downtown Milwaukee, Wisconsin February 23, 2015.

Credit: Reuters/Brendan O’Brien


(Reuters) – Wisconsin lawmakers on Thursday began a final debate on a measure supported by Republican Governor Scott Walker that would prohibit private-sector workers from being required to join a union or pay dues when working under union contracts.

Walker, a presidential hopeful, is expected to sign the right-to-work bill on Monday if it gets to his desk after what could be a 24-hour session in the state Assembly.

Protesters shouting “right-to-work is wrong for Wisconsin” from the Assembly gallery brought a temporary halt to the session on Thursday afternoon, drawing an order for security to clear the viewing area.

Dozens of demonstrators who tried to get onto the Assembly floor were blocked by capitol security officers.

The state Senate approved the bill last week, and the Assembly, where Republicans hold a 63-36 majority, is expected to follow suit to make Wisconsin the 25th state to enact a right-to-work law.

Supporters cast the measure as an incentive for keeping and attracting businesses and jobs, while opponents call it a thinly disguised assault on organized labor.

“Today is a great day for individual liberty,” Republican Representative Daniel Knodl said before the debate began.

Thousands of workers demonstrated last week when senators debated the bill, but capitol crowds have been far thinner than four years ago, when tens of thousands of people protested a push for a law limiting the powers of public sector unions.

A few hundred demonstrators opposed to the bill rallied outside the capitol on Thursday.

“There is really not much we can do. It’s done,” said Kanita Hunter, 35, a union member from Milwaukee.

Walker’s push for the bill covering public-sector workers raised his profile among Republicans, and his support grew when he survived a union-backed recall election in 2012. He has emerged as an early favorite in the battle for the Republican nomination in the November 2016 presidential election.

“This is a very destructive bill for the middle class,” Assembly Minority Leader Peter Barca said before the debate.

About 8 percent of private-sector workers in Wisconsin are union members, down from about 22 percent three decades ago, according to Unionstats.com, a website that tracks U.S. union membership and labor statistics.

“A law like this would have never been entertained two decades ago,” University of Wisconsin-Madison political scientist John Ahlquist said. “The law is a symbol of the weakness of unions.”

(Editing by Mohammad Zargham, Bill Trott and Eric Walsh)


Source: Newsjyoti Politics

Wisconsin Assembly debate begins on right-to-work bill

A crowd of about 200 people and union members gather in frigid temperatures in downtown Milwaukee, Wisconsin February 23, 2015. REUTERS/Brendan O'Brien

A crowd of about 200 people and union members gather in frigid temperatures in downtown Milwaukee, Wisconsin February 23, 2015.

Credit: Reuters/Brendan O’Brien


(Reuters) – Wisconsin lawmakers on Thursday began a final debate on a measure supported by Republican Governor Scott Walker that would prohibit private-sector workers from being required to join a union or pay dues when working under union contracts.

Walker, a presidential hopeful, is expected to sign the right-to-work bill on Monday if it gets to his desk after what could be a 24-hour session in the state Assembly.

Protesters shouting “right-to-work is wrong for Wisconsin” from the Assembly gallery brought a temporary halt to the session on Thursday afternoon, drawing an order for security to clear the viewing area.

Dozens of demonstrators who tried to get onto the Assembly floor were blocked by capitol security officers.

The state Senate approved the bill last week, and the Assembly, where Republicans hold a 63-36 majority, is expected to follow suit to make Wisconsin the 25th state to enact a right-to-work law.

Supporters cast the measure as an incentive for keeping and attracting businesses and jobs, while opponents call it a thinly disguised assault on organized labor.

“Today is a great day for individual liberty,” Republican Representative Daniel Knodl said before the debate began.

Thousands of workers demonstrated last week when senators debated the bill, but capitol crowds have been far thinner than four years ago, when tens of thousands of people protested a push for a law limiting the powers of public sector unions.

A few hundred demonstrators opposed to the bill rallied outside the capitol on Thursday.

“There is really not much we can do. It’s done,” said Kanita Hunter, 35, a union member from Milwaukee.

Walker’s push for the bill covering public-sector workers raised his profile among Republicans, and his support grew when he survived a union-backed recall election in 2012. He has emerged as an early favorite in the battle for the Republican nomination in the November 2016 presidential election.

“This is a very destructive bill for the middle class,” Assembly Minority Leader Peter Barca said before the debate.

About 8 percent of private-sector workers in Wisconsin are union members, down from about 22 percent three decades ago, according to Unionstats.com, a website that tracks U.S. union membership and labor statistics.

“A law like this would have never been entertained two decades ago,” University of Wisconsin-Madison political scientist John Ahlquist said. “The law is a symbol of the weakness of unions.”

(Editing by Mohammad Zargham, Bill Trott and Eric Walsh)


Source: Newsjyoti Politics

Tribeca Festival blends films, live performances in varied slate

(Reuters) – From a crime drama starring actress Glenn Close to an Arnold Schwarzenegger film about a deadly zombie epidemic to an expose of the financial crisis, the Tribeca Film Festival unveiled a varied slate of movies on Thursday.

After announcing the documentary and narrative films in competition on Tuesday, the festival revealed its full schedule of nearly 100 feature-length films.

As in previous years, the downtown New York event will pair films with live music, dance and comedy performances linked to them.

“Mary J. Blige – The London Sessions,” about the recording of one of the rhythm and blues singer’s albums, will be followed by a concert at the Beacon Theater. A special dance performance will accompany “A Ballerina’s Tale,” which offers a peek into the daily life of Misty Copeland of New York’s American Ballet Theatre.

“Seeing a film together alongside a live performance heightens the experience, engages the imagination and brings audiences together is an unforgettable way,” Genna Terranova, the festival’s director, said in a statement.

The festival line-up will include the world premiere of “Anesthesia,” about a New York college professor mugged near his home and starring Sam Waterston, Glenn Close and Kristen Stewart.

Schwarzenegger, California’s former governor, will be back on the big screen in “Maggie” as a small-town farmer whose daughter is infected in an epidemic threatening humanity.

And in “The Wannabe,” based on the events surrounding the trial of American mobster John Gotti in 1992, best supporting Oscar winner Patricia Arquette (“Boyhood”) embarks on a crime spree.

Documentaries, always a major component at Tribeca, include “The Emperor’s New Clothes,” an expose of the impact of the financial crisis by English writer/director Michael Winterbottom and comedian Russell Brand.

The festival, which runs from April 16-26, was founded in 2001 by actor Robert De Niro, producer Jane Rosenthal and investor Craig Hatkoff to revitalize the downtown New York neighborhood following the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks on the World Trade Center.

(Reporting by Patricia Reaney; Editing by Piya Sinha-Roy)


Source: Newsjyoti Entertainment

Tribeca Festival blends films, live performances in varied slate

(Reuters) – From a crime drama starring actress Glenn Close to an Arnold Schwarzenegger film about a deadly zombie epidemic to an expose of the financial crisis, the Tribeca Film Festival unveiled a varied slate of movies on Thursday.

After announcing the documentary and narrative films in competition on Tuesday, the festival revealed its full schedule of nearly 100 feature-length films.

As in previous years, the downtown New York event will pair films with live music, dance and comedy performances linked to them.

“Mary J. Blige – The London Sessions,” about the recording of one of the rhythm and blues singer’s albums, will be followed by a concert at the Beacon Theater. A special dance performance will accompany “A Ballerina’s Tale,” which offers a peek into the daily life of Misty Copeland of New York’s American Ballet Theatre.

“Seeing a film together alongside a live performance heightens the experience, engages the imagination and brings audiences together is an unforgettable way,” Genna Terranova, the festival’s director, said in a statement.

The festival line-up will include the world premiere of “Anesthesia,” about a New York college professor mugged near his home and starring Sam Waterston, Glenn Close and Kristen Stewart.

Schwarzenegger, California’s former governor, will be back on the big screen in “Maggie” as a small-town farmer whose daughter is infected in an epidemic threatening humanity.

And in “The Wannabe,” based on the events surrounding the trial of American mobster John Gotti in 1992, best supporting Oscar winner Patricia Arquette (“Boyhood”) embarks on a crime spree.

Documentaries, always a major component at Tribeca, include “The Emperor’s New Clothes,” an expose of the impact of the financial crisis by English writer/director Michael Winterbottom and comedian Russell Brand.

The festival, which runs from April 16-26, was founded in 2001 by actor Robert De Niro, producer Jane Rosenthal and investor Craig Hatkoff to revitalize the downtown New York neighborhood following the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks on the World Trade Center.

(Reporting by Patricia Reaney; Editing by Piya Sinha-Roy)


Source: Newsjyoti Entertainment