Daily Archives: March 2, 2015

Exclusive: Guinea says Ebola patients sent home after botched blood tests

DAKAR Tue Mar 3, 2015 5:12am IST

A billboard with a message about Ebola is seen on a street in Conakry, Guinea October 26, 2014. REUTERS/Michelle Nichols

A billboard with a message about Ebola is seen on a street in Conakry, Guinea October 26, 2014.

Credit: Reuters/Michelle Nichols

DAKAR (Reuters) – Health officials botched more than 20 Ebola blood tests in January and February which led to the release of at least four positive patients, two of whom later died, Guinea’s anti-Ebola coordinator and other health officials told Reuters.

Five health officials and experts familiar with the incidents said the mistakes occurred at two different treatment centers and resulted in as many as 52 botched tests, exposing many others to the virus and revealing weaknesses in Guinea’s response to the crisis.

Dr. Sakoba Keita, Guinea’s anti-Ebola coordinator, confirmed the mistake had occurred but gave lower figures. He said in an emailed response to questions that 23 patients were affected, of whom four tested positive when they were retested and two died.

“This error was detected and the order was immediately given to withdraw the tubes and to find the sick in order to test them again,” Keita said.

Health officials, some of whom asked not to be named because they were worried about embarrassing the Guinean government, said the mistakes took place in Coyah, where Cuban medics are supporting a government-run center, and in Conakry, where medical charity Medicins Sans Frontieres runs a center at the Donka hospital complex, when staff placed blood samples in the wrong test tubes, damaging specimens.

Patients were discharged from the centers in western Guinea, one of the biggest remaining Ebola hot spots in the region, after the test results came back negative from the laboratory at Donka, the health officials said.

At least six patients were later found to be Ebola-positive when further tests were carried out, and two of them died, the officials said.

“There were deficiencies from the moment the samples were taken right through to the test results,” said one health official in Guinea, who requested anonymity.

The incident involved many actors in the Ebola response in Guinea, where the current outbreak was first confirmed a year ago and officials are scrambling to meet a regional deadline to reduce the number of cases to zero within six weeks.

The worst Ebola outbreak on record has killed nearly 10,000 people across West Africa. Guinea has recorded 2,091 deaths – fewer than in Liberia and Sierra Leone, the other worst-hit nations – and cases have fallen sharply in the past month.

Several officials said the blood test incident pointed to gaps in the country’s response.

“It’s not that their staff didn’t receive training. It’s just a question of being rigid and organized and that seems to be hard for Guinea,” said a Western health expert who spent months in the country.

TEST TUBE MIX-UP

MSF said it discovered on Feb. 6 that blood samples from 43 patients taken from its Donka center had been placed in tubes containing the blood-thinning drug heparin.

Heparin typically takes the form of an invisible coating inside a tube whereas Ebola tubes are either empty or contain a blood preservative called EDTA. It should have been easy to identify the correct tubes since the set containing heparin have green lids and the ones used for Ebola are red or purple.

The World Health Organization (WHO) said staff taking samples had run out of the correct tubes and instead used the heparin tubes, without reporting it.

“MSF took the incident very seriously and immediately replaced the tubes and opened an investigation,” said Rosa Crestani, MSF’s emergency program coordinator.

Three of those tested were later discovered to be Ebola positive and recovered, she said. No one who came in contact with the trio contracted the disease.

At the Coyah center, Guinea’s busiest Ebola facility, which is also supported by staff from the African Union, the samples of nine people were accidentally placed in tubes also containing heparin, said another health official.

The official said that after initially being found to be negative, three of the nine later tested positive, of whom two died. No further cases among contacts of the Ebola patients released from Coyah have been identified, he said.

President Alpha Conde hopes to get to zero cases by mid-April as he seeks to lure back mining investment ahead of a presidential vote due later this year.

But Guinea is still battling often violent resistance to its Ebola health campaign. One of the sources said that a similar mix-up had occurred in late 2014. The government did not respond to a question about whether it had happened before.

Guinea has received less financial aid than other Ebola countries, with $266 million in commitments – about half that for Sierra Leone and a third of Liberia’s total, according to the U.N. financial tracking service.

France is providing technical support to its former colony, but it has not launched a military operation like Britain did for Sierra Leone and the United States did in Liberia.

The WHO said the mistake was not detected in the Donka laboratory, which tested both sets of samples, where technicians had received a “huge amount of samples”.

The laboratory is run by Guinea and supported by the Institut Pasteur de Dakar – a foundation created in 2009 by a statute signed between Senegal and France’s Institut Pasteur.

Dr. Andre Spiegel, director of the Institut Pasteur Dakar, declined to comment, saying the information was sensitive and confidential.

Guinea’s Keita said the WHO had sent a supervisor to assist the laboratory.

Another Western official in Guinea said partners in a Guinea anti-Ebola drug test were now nervous about extending it to other centers in Guinea such as Coyah.

Dr. Dan Kelly, founder of the Wellbody Alliance providing healthcare in Sierra Leone, said it was not unusual for centers to run out of test tubes, but procedures existed.

“Stock outs happen. What you are supposed to do is wait for the right colored tubes to arrive,” he said.

(Reporting by Emma Farge; Additional reporting by Misha Hussain for the Thomson Reuters Foundation; Editing by David Lewis, Sonya Hepinstall and Leslie Adler)

Source: Newsjyoti India health

Exclusive: Guinea says Ebola patients sent home after botched blood tests

DAKAR Tue Mar 3, 2015 5:12am IST

A billboard with a message about Ebola is seen on a street in Conakry, Guinea October 26, 2014. REUTERS/Michelle Nichols

A billboard with a message about Ebola is seen on a street in Conakry, Guinea October 26, 2014.

Credit: Reuters/Michelle Nichols

DAKAR (Reuters) – Health officials botched more than 20 Ebola blood tests in January and February which led to the release of at least four positive patients, two of whom later died, Guinea’s anti-Ebola coordinator and other health officials told Reuters.

Five health officials and experts familiar with the incidents said the mistakes occurred at two different treatment centers and resulted in as many as 52 botched tests, exposing many others to the virus and revealing weaknesses in Guinea’s response to the crisis.

Dr. Sakoba Keita, Guinea’s anti-Ebola coordinator, confirmed the mistake had occurred but gave lower figures. He said in an emailed response to questions that 23 patients were affected, of whom four tested positive when they were retested and two died.

“This error was detected and the order was immediately given to withdraw the tubes and to find the sick in order to test them again,” Keita said.

Health officials, some of whom asked not to be named because they were worried about embarrassing the Guinean government, said the mistakes took place in Coyah, where Cuban medics are supporting a government-run center, and in Conakry, where medical charity Medicins Sans Frontieres runs a center at the Donka hospital complex, when staff placed blood samples in the wrong test tubes, damaging specimens.

Patients were discharged from the centers in western Guinea, one of the biggest remaining Ebola hot spots in the region, after the test results came back negative from the laboratory at Donka, the health officials said.

At least six patients were later found to be Ebola-positive when further tests were carried out, and two of them died, the officials said.

“There were deficiencies from the moment the samples were taken right through to the test results,” said one health official in Guinea, who requested anonymity.

The incident involved many actors in the Ebola response in Guinea, where the current outbreak was first confirmed a year ago and officials are scrambling to meet a regional deadline to reduce the number of cases to zero within six weeks.

The worst Ebola outbreak on record has killed nearly 10,000 people across West Africa. Guinea has recorded 2,091 deaths – fewer than in Liberia and Sierra Leone, the other worst-hit nations – and cases have fallen sharply in the past month.

Several officials said the blood test incident pointed to gaps in the country’s response.

“It’s not that their staff didn’t receive training. It’s just a question of being rigid and organized and that seems to be hard for Guinea,” said a Western health expert who spent months in the country.

TEST TUBE MIX-UP

MSF said it discovered on Feb. 6 that blood samples from 43 patients taken from its Donka center had been placed in tubes containing the blood-thinning drug heparin.

Heparin typically takes the form of an invisible coating inside a tube whereas Ebola tubes are either empty or contain a blood preservative called EDTA. It should have been easy to identify the correct tubes since the set containing heparin have green lids and the ones used for Ebola are red or purple.

The World Health Organization (WHO) said staff taking samples had run out of the correct tubes and instead used the heparin tubes, without reporting it.

“MSF took the incident very seriously and immediately replaced the tubes and opened an investigation,” said Rosa Crestani, MSF’s emergency program coordinator.

Three of those tested were later discovered to be Ebola positive and recovered, she said. No one who came in contact with the trio contracted the disease.

At the Coyah center, Guinea’s busiest Ebola facility, which is also supported by staff from the African Union, the samples of nine people were accidentally placed in tubes also containing heparin, said another health official.

The official said that after initially being found to be negative, three of the nine later tested positive, of whom two died. No further cases among contacts of the Ebola patients released from Coyah have been identified, he said.

President Alpha Conde hopes to get to zero cases by mid-April as he seeks to lure back mining investment ahead of a presidential vote due later this year.

But Guinea is still battling often violent resistance to its Ebola health campaign. One of the sources said that a similar mix-up had occurred in late 2014. The government did not respond to a question about whether it had happened before.

Guinea has received less financial aid than other Ebola countries, with $266 million in commitments – about half that for Sierra Leone and a third of Liberia’s total, according to the U.N. financial tracking service.

France is providing technical support to its former colony, but it has not launched a military operation like Britain did for Sierra Leone and the United States did in Liberia.

The WHO said the mistake was not detected in the Donka laboratory, which tested both sets of samples, where technicians had received a “huge amount of samples”.

The laboratory is run by Guinea and supported by the Institut Pasteur de Dakar – a foundation created in 2009 by a statute signed between Senegal and France’s Institut Pasteur.

Dr. Andre Spiegel, director of the Institut Pasteur Dakar, declined to comment, saying the information was sensitive and confidential.

Guinea’s Keita said the WHO had sent a supervisor to assist the laboratory.

Another Western official in Guinea said partners in a Guinea anti-Ebola drug test were now nervous about extending it to other centers in Guinea such as Coyah.

Dr. Dan Kelly, founder of the Wellbody Alliance providing healthcare in Sierra Leone, said it was not unusual for centers to run out of test tubes, but procedures existed.

“Stock outs happen. What you are supposed to do is wait for the right colored tubes to arrive,” he said.

(Reporting by Emma Farge; Additional reporting by Misha Hussain for the Thomson Reuters Foundation; Editing by David Lewis, Sonya Hepinstall and Leslie Adler)

Source: Newsjyoti India health

UPDATE 2-Tullow falls on worries legal dispute could delay Ghana project

(Adds comment from Ghana authorities)

By Sarah Young

(Reuters) – Tullow Oil lost over 200
million pounds ($308 million) of its market value on Monday, hit
by concerns that a boundary dispute between Ivory Coast and
Ghana could delay a project off the coast of West Africa.

The Africa-focused firm is developing the TEN project off
the coast of Ghana, in waters over which there is a maritime
boundary dispute between Ghana and Ivory Coast.

Ivory Coast has made a request to the authority handling the
case, the International Tribunal of the Law of the Sea (ITLOS),
that Ghana suspend ongoing exploration and exploitation
operations in the disputed area while the matter is considered.

Tullow now faces a period of uncertainty while the tribunal
makes a decision on the Ivorian request, which the company said
was expected by the end of April.

Ghana dismissed fears of possible suspension of the project,
saying there are no grounds for the grant of the Ivorian
request.

“Government therefore says it sees no reason for any change
in behaviour unless and until the Special Chamber of the ITLOS
so orders, which the Government considers highly unlikely,” a
government statement said late on Monday.

“As permitted by international law, petroleum operations in
the area will continue pending a speedy decision by the Special
Chamber on this aspect of the case,” said the statement signed
by Communications Minister Edward Omane Boamah.

Shares in Tullow lost over 6 percent of their value, making
the company the top faller on Britain’s bluechip index
and putting them not far off a six-year low hit in January.

“This has the potential to cause serious delays to Tullow’s
flagship TEN project, which could significantly delay
much-needed cash flow and put the balance sheet under pressure,”
First Energy Capital analysts said in a note.

Tullow is due to finish work on TEN and start pumping oil by
mid-2016, more than a year before ITLOS is expected to give a
verdict in the maritime border dispute case.

The company, which sources almost half of its total oil
production in Ghana and also has smaller operations in Ivory
Coast, said its legal advice was that Ghana’s boundary claim had
a strong case under international law.

($1 = 0.6500 pounds)

(Additional reporting by Alistair Smout and Alasdair Pal and
Kwasi Kpodo in Accra; Editing by Matthew Mpoke Bigg and Chris
Reese)


Source: Newsjyoti Hot Stock News

UPDATE 2-Tullow falls on worries legal dispute could delay Ghana project

(Adds comment from Ghana authorities)

By Sarah Young

(Reuters) – Tullow Oil lost over 200
million pounds ($308 million) of its market value on Monday, hit
by concerns that a boundary dispute between Ivory Coast and
Ghana could delay a project off the coast of West Africa.

The Africa-focused firm is developing the TEN project off
the coast of Ghana, in waters over which there is a maritime
boundary dispute between Ghana and Ivory Coast.

Ivory Coast has made a request to the authority handling the
case, the International Tribunal of the Law of the Sea (ITLOS),
that Ghana suspend ongoing exploration and exploitation
operations in the disputed area while the matter is considered.

Tullow now faces a period of uncertainty while the tribunal
makes a decision on the Ivorian request, which the company said
was expected by the end of April.

Ghana dismissed fears of possible suspension of the project,
saying there are no grounds for the grant of the Ivorian
request.

“Government therefore says it sees no reason for any change
in behaviour unless and until the Special Chamber of the ITLOS
so orders, which the Government considers highly unlikely,” a
government statement said late on Monday.

“As permitted by international law, petroleum operations in
the area will continue pending a speedy decision by the Special
Chamber on this aspect of the case,” said the statement signed
by Communications Minister Edward Omane Boamah.

Shares in Tullow lost over 6 percent of their value, making
the company the top faller on Britain’s bluechip index
and putting them not far off a six-year low hit in January.

“This has the potential to cause serious delays to Tullow’s
flagship TEN project, which could significantly delay
much-needed cash flow and put the balance sheet under pressure,”
First Energy Capital analysts said in a note.

Tullow is due to finish work on TEN and start pumping oil by
mid-2016, more than a year before ITLOS is expected to give a
verdict in the maritime border dispute case.

The company, which sources almost half of its total oil
production in Ghana and also has smaller operations in Ivory
Coast, said its legal advice was that Ghana’s boundary claim had
a strong case under international law.

($1 = 0.6500 pounds)

(Additional reporting by Alistair Smout and Alasdair Pal and
Kwasi Kpodo in Accra; Editing by Matthew Mpoke Bigg and Chris
Reese)


Source: Newsjyoti Hot Stock News

Exclusive: Obama defends lack of 'Plan B' for Obamacare court case

WASHINGTON Tue Mar 3, 2015 3:46am IST

U.S. President Barack Obama takes his seat for an exclusive interview with Reuters in the Library of the White House in Washington March 2, 2015. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

U.S. President Barack Obama takes his seat for an exclusive interview with Reuters in the Library of the White House in Washington March 2, 2015.

Credit: Reuters/Kevin Lamarque

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – President Barack Obama on Monday said he thinks there is no “plausible legal basis” for the U.S. Supreme Court to strike down a key plank of Obamacare, defending his administration’s lack of a contingency plan.

And he promised to rule on the Keystone XL pipeline before he leaves office, although he would not say whether it will take him “weeks or months” to determine whether the project is in the national interest.

Obama touched on two main domestic policy issues during an interview with Reuters.

On the Affordable Care Act, his signature policy achievement commonly referred to as Obamacare, the Supreme Court is set to hear oral arguments on Wednesday in the case known as King v. Burwell.

The case challenges wording in the 2010 law that could affect whether residents in at least 34 U.S. states are eligible for federal tax subsidies to help them buy insurance.

“Look, this should be a pretty straightforward case of statutory interpretation,” Obama said.

“If you look at the law, if you look at the testimony of those who are involved in the law, including some of the opponents of the law, the understanding was that people who joined a federal exchange were going to be able to access tax credits just like if they went through a state exchange,” he said.

“There is, in our view, not a plausible legal basis for striking it down,” he said.

If the Supreme Court disagrees, Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia Burwell has told lawmakers that there are no contingency plans to deal with the loss of subsidies.

“If they rule against us, we’ll have to take a look at what our options are. But I’m not going to anticipate that. I’m not going to anticipate bad law,” Obama told Reuters.

On the Canada-to-Texas Keystone crude oil pipeline, which has been in limbo for more than six years, Obama said a decision “will happen before the end of my administration, definitely.”

Asked whether it would take weeks or months, he answered with a smile: “Weeks or months.”

The TransCanada Corp pipeline would carry 830,000 barrels a day of mostly Canadian oil sands crude.

Environmentalists have fought the pipeline because they argue it will spur development of a fuel they say is more polluting than other types of crude oil.

Energy industry officials argue that oil sands development is destined to expand and blocking Keystone would do nothing to discourage development.

(Reporting By Jeff Mason; Writing by Roberta Rampton, Valerie Volcovici, Patrick Rucker; Editing by Grant McCool)

Source: Newsjyoti India health

Exclusive: Obama defends lack of 'Plan B' for Obamacare court case

WASHINGTON Tue Mar 3, 2015 3:46am IST

U.S. President Barack Obama takes his seat for an exclusive interview with Reuters in the Library of the White House in Washington March 2, 2015. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

U.S. President Barack Obama takes his seat for an exclusive interview with Reuters in the Library of the White House in Washington March 2, 2015.

Credit: Reuters/Kevin Lamarque

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – President Barack Obama on Monday said he thinks there is no “plausible legal basis” for the U.S. Supreme Court to strike down a key plank of Obamacare, defending his administration’s lack of a contingency plan.

And he promised to rule on the Keystone XL pipeline before he leaves office, although he would not say whether it will take him “weeks or months” to determine whether the project is in the national interest.

Obama touched on two main domestic policy issues during an interview with Reuters.

On the Affordable Care Act, his signature policy achievement commonly referred to as Obamacare, the Supreme Court is set to hear oral arguments on Wednesday in the case known as King v. Burwell.

The case challenges wording in the 2010 law that could affect whether residents in at least 34 U.S. states are eligible for federal tax subsidies to help them buy insurance.

“Look, this should be a pretty straightforward case of statutory interpretation,” Obama said.

“If you look at the law, if you look at the testimony of those who are involved in the law, including some of the opponents of the law, the understanding was that people who joined a federal exchange were going to be able to access tax credits just like if they went through a state exchange,” he said.

“There is, in our view, not a plausible legal basis for striking it down,” he said.

If the Supreme Court disagrees, Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia Burwell has told lawmakers that there are no contingency plans to deal with the loss of subsidies.

“If they rule against us, we’ll have to take a look at what our options are. But I’m not going to anticipate that. I’m not going to anticipate bad law,” Obama told Reuters.

On the Canada-to-Texas Keystone crude oil pipeline, which has been in limbo for more than six years, Obama said a decision “will happen before the end of my administration, definitely.”

Asked whether it would take weeks or months, he answered with a smile: “Weeks or months.”

The TransCanada Corp pipeline would carry 830,000 barrels a day of mostly Canadian oil sands crude.

Environmentalists have fought the pipeline because they argue it will spur development of a fuel they say is more polluting than other types of crude oil.

Energy industry officials argue that oil sands development is destined to expand and blocking Keystone would do nothing to discourage development.

(Reporting By Jeff Mason; Writing by Roberta Rampton, Valerie Volcovici, Patrick Rucker; Editing by Grant McCool)

Source: Newsjyoti India health

Kerry cautions Israel not to undercut Iran diplomacy as talks resume

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry gestures during a news conference after he delivered remarks to the United Nations Human Rights Council in Geneva March 2, 2015.  REUTERS/Evan Vucci/Pool

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry gestures during a news conference after he delivered remarks to the United Nations Human Rights Council in Geneva March 2, 2015.

Credit: Reuters/Evan Vucci/Pool


(Reuters) – U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry quietly cautioned Israel not to undercut nuclear negotiations with Iran that resumed on Monday as Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu prepared to make the case in Washington against the diplomacy.

Kerry and Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif met for about 90 minutes on the first of what could be three days of talks in the Swiss lakeside town of Montreux on curbing Iran’s nuclear program in exchange for relief from economic sanctions.

The two men, along with U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz and Iranian atomic energy chief Ali Akbar Salehi, shook hands and then met for about 50 minutes on Monday afternoon, followed by a second session of about 40 minutes.

Both sides postured in advance and suggested the other would be to blame if the talks fail to meet an end-March deadline for a framework accord. Kerry said Iran must be prepared to compromise and Zarif called for the total lifting of sanctions imposed on the Islamic Republic as part of any final deal.

Speaking to reporters in Geneva before the meeting, Kerry struck a balance between defending Israel before the U.N. Human Rights Council, which Washington has long accused of anti-Israel bias, and also suggesting the Israelis not undermine the talks.

“We are concerned by reports that suggest selective details of the ongoing negotiations will be discussed publicly in the coming days,” he said, apparently alluding to Netanyahu’s planned speech on Tuesday before the U.S. Congress.

“Doing so would make it more difficult to reach the goal that Israel and others say they share in order to get to a good deal,” Kerry said. “Israel’s security is absolutely at the forefront of all of our minds, but frankly so is the security of all of the other countries in the region. So is our security.”

Netanyahu says he fears U.S. President Barack Obama’s Iran diplomacy could allow Israel’s arch Middle East adversary to develop atomic weapons. U.S. officials say the best way to prevent that outcome is a negotiated settlement.

Washington and some allies, notably Israel, suspect Iran has used its civilian nuclear program as a cover to develop a nuclear weapons capability. Iran denies this, saying its program is for peaceful purposes such as generating electricity.

“MORAL OBLIGATION”

Netanyahu’s main aim is to warn U.S. lawmakers about the risks of a deal with Iran and to keep alive the possibility of Congress passing new sanctions, a step critics say could scuttle the talks and raise the risk of war. Critics also suspect him of seeking political gain before Israel’s March 17 election.

In a speech to the powerful pro-Israel lobby group AIPAC in Washington on Monday, Netanyahu said the nuclear deal being negotiated could threaten Israel’s survival and said he had a “moral obligation” to speak up about the issue.

U.S. officials have offered equivocal assessments of where they are in the talks with Iran that involve five other major powers: Russia, China, Britain, France and Germany. They have set an end-June deadline for a final detailed settlement.

“We have made some progress but we still have a long way to go and the clock is ticking,” Kerry told reporters before driving to Montreux. “We’re going to find out whether or not Iran is willing to make the hard choices that are necessary.”

Kerry said a vital component would be a rigorous international inspection regime to ensure Iran was not seeking nuclear weapons, saying the Islamic Republic already has the knowledge to make fissile material.

“You can’t bomb knowledge into oblivion unless you kill everybody,” he said. “You can’t bomb it away.”

Zarif put the onus on the United States and its partners to lift sanctions to achieve a deal. “If they want an agreement, sanctions must go … We believe all sanctions must be lifted,” Zarif told reporters in Geneva.

One of the disputes holding up a final agreement is over the pace at which sanctions should be dismantled. Tehran wants them rapidly removed while Western powers want gradual steps responding to Iranian performance in implementing the accord.

(Additional reporting by Stephanie Nebehay in Geneva, Matt Spetalnick and Emily Stephenson in Washington; Editing by Mark Heinrich and Gareth Jones)


Source: Newsjyoti Top Trending

London calling: A burger guy on its sizzling spots

The London Eye is seen near the Houses of Parliament at dawn in central London in this file photo taken on October 21, 2013. REUTERS/Toby Melville


(Reuters) – When it comes to hot restaurants and IPOs, it’s hard to get any hotter than Shake Shack. The high-end burger joint, now publicly traded, has locations from Dubai to Moscow. But London is especially close to the heart of Shake Shack’s CEO, Randy Garutti.

“London has always been one of my favorite cities in the world,” says Garutti, who is based in New York. “Whenever I get off the plane, I’m immediately comfortable.”

Here is Garutti’s cheat sheet for spending two days – with a bit of sizzle – across the pond.

Best way to get to town from the airport: “Depending on where I’m staying, I’ll either just take the Tube or the Heathrow Express to Paddington. I almost never take a London taxi, because as fun as they are, it’s just too expensive.”

Where to go when you land: “I head straight to the Covent Garden Shake Shack (24 Market Building, The Piazza) for my burger fix.”

Cuppa…coffee: “Two great spots are Workshop Coffee Co. (27 Clerkenwell Road) or Prufrock Coffee (23-25 Leather Lane).”

Favorite bar: “Head to the Ape & Bird by Russell Norman (142 Shaftesbury Avenue). A beer and some light fare kicks off the trip right.”

Get some rest: “The Soho Hotel (4 Richmond Mews) is one of my favorite hotels in London. Great, unique rooms and the best location.”

Power breakfast: “When I’m feeling old school, The Wolseley (160 Piccadilly).”

Where to have a productive business meeting: “I always go for a quiet hotel lobby. The Soho Hotel is ideal.”

In-between meetings: “Borough Market (8 Southwark Street) might be one of my favorite places in the world to grab a bite and check out what’s new in the best small food purveyors in London.”

Tourist trap that’s worth the crowds: “You can’t help but walk by Big Ben, Parliament and the London Eye. Always a fun escape.”

Best place for a team outing: “I’ll always choose food when looking for a place to gather with the team. St. John (26 St. John Street) is amazing. For a more special occasion, go to Dinner by Heston Blumenthal at the Mandarin Oriental Hyde Park (66 Knightsbridge).”

Don’t miss: “Hawksmoor steak houses (five locations, including 157a Commercial Street) where Will Beckett and his team do it better than anyone for sincere and welcoming hospitality – and one hell of a steak.”

Before you go: “I always pick up something from Neal’s Yard Dairy, purveyor of artisanal cheeses (17 Shorts Gardens), to bring home.”

(Follow us @ReutersMoney or here; Editing by Lauren Young and Leslie Adler)


Source: Newsjyoti Lifestyle

Bill Gates tops Forbes rich list, Michael Jordan joins

Tue Mar 3, 2015 2:13am IST

1: Bill Gates is still the richest man in the world with an estimated net worth of $79.2 billion, according to the latest Forbes ranking of the world's billionaires. REUTERS/Suzanne Plunkett

1 of 7. 1: Bill Gates is still the richest man in the world with an estimated net worth of $79.2 billion, according to the latest Forbes ranking of the world’s billionaires.

Credit: Reuters/Suzanne Plunkett

<span class="focusParagraph articleLocation”>(Reuters) – Bill Gates stands atop Forbes magazine’s annual list of the world’s richest people, as Facebook Inc’s (FB.O) Mark Zuckerberg joined the top 20 and basketball star Michael Jordan ploughed new air by making the list for the first time.

Gates’ net worth rose to $79.2 billion from $76 billion a year earlier, putting the Microsoft Corp (MSFT.O) co-founder at the top for the 16th year in the last 21, Forbes said on Monday.

Mexico telecommunications mogul Carlos Slim Helu ranked second, worth $77.1 billion, while Berkshire Hathaway Inc (BRKa.N) chief Warren Buffett was third, at $72.7 billion.

Amancio Ortega, the Spanish founder of Inditex SA (ITX.MC), which includes clothing retailer Zara, was fourth at $64.5 billion, while Oracle Corp (ORCL.N) Chairman Larry Ellison was fifth at $54.3 billion.

Buffett’s fortune grew $14.5 billion from a year earlier, more than anyone’s else, despite his having donated $2.8 billion to several charities last July.

Aliko Dangote, a Nigerian who became Africa’s richest man through cement manufacturing and commodities such as flour and sugar, was the biggest loser, falling $10.3 billion to $14.7 billion.

Forbes identified a record 1,826 billionaires, up from 1,645 last year, worth a combined $7.05 trillion.

Of the record 197 women, the highest-ranked was Wal-Mart Stores Inc (WMT.N) heiress Christy Walton, who was eighth at $41.7 billion.

France’s Liliane Bettencourt, who got much of her wealth from cosmetics company L’Oreal SA (OREP.PA), was 10th at $40.1 billion.

Zuckerberg, 30, rose to 16th place from 21st last year, as his net worth grew to $33.4 billion.

The youngest billionaires were Evan Spiegel, 24, and Bobby Murphy, 25, who co-founded mobile messaging app Snapchat, and are each worth $1.5 billion.

Meanwhile, Jordan ranked 1,741st with a $1 billion net worth. The 52-year-old is majority owner of the Charlotte Hornets basketball team, but is better known for his Hall of Fame playing days with the Chicago Bulls and endorsement contract with Nike Inc (NKE.N), which makes Air Jordan shoes.

Jordan’s business manager did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

The United States had the most billionaires, with 536, followed by China at 213, Germany at 103 and India at 90.

Russia, which has struggled with currency and oil market turmoil, saw its collection of billionaires fall to 88 from 111, Forbes said.

(Reporting by Jonathan Stempel in New York; editing by Gunna Dickson)

Source: Newsjyoti Top National News

ADM finance chief to oversee Asia business in management shuffle

(Reuters) – Archer Daniels Midland Co
on Monday said its chief financial officer will assume
oversight of business in Asia as the commodity trader looks to
expand operations in the fast-growing region.

Ray Young will keep his job as ADM’s CFO and become an
executive vice president to help the agribusiness company
“accelerate our Asia strategy,” Chief Executive Juan Luciano
said in a statement that announced other management changes.

Before joining ADM in 2010, Young worked in Shanghai as a
vice president for General Motors Co and also in Japan.

ADM has focused on expanding its dealings in Asia to take
advantage of the region’s growing middle-class population and
last year increased its stake in Wilmar International
of Singapore. This year, the company is set to complete its
first wholly owned food-ingredient production facility in China.

In 2013, ADM failed in a A$2.8 billion ($2.18 billion) bid
to acquire Australian grain handler Graincorp Ltd, a
deal that would have improved its access to Asian markets. ADM
still owns 20 percent of Graincorp.

In another change, ADM named Mark Bemis, who was a senior
vice president and the president of corn processing, as the
president of North America operations. He will be responsible
for “finding new pockets of growth in the U.S.,” as well as
expanding business in Mexico and Canada, Luciano said.

The appointments are the latest management changes after
Luciano became CEO in January when Patricia Woertz stepped down
from the post she had held since 2006.

Last month, ADM reported higher quarterly earnings as a
record-large U.S. harvest boosted grain volumes and supported
strong exports.

ADM is one of four large agribusinesses known as the ABCDs
that dominate the global grain trade. The others are Bunge Ltd
, Cargill Inc and Louis Dreyfus Corp.
($1 = 1.2873 Australian dollars)

(Reporting by Tom Polansek, editing by G Crosse)


Source: Newsjyoti Company News