Daily Archives: February 9, 2015

Microsoft, Samsung settle contract dispute over patents

People are silhouetted as they pose with mobile devices in front of a screen projected with a Samsung logo, in this file picture illustration taken in Zenica October 29, 2014.
Credit: Reuters/Dado Ruvic/Files

(Reuters) – Microsoft and Samsung Electronics Co Ltd have settled a contract dispute over patent royalties, though terms of the settlement are confidential, Microsoft said in a statement on Monday.
Microsoft sued Samsung last year in a federal court in New York, accusing Samsung of breaching a collaboration agreement by initially refusing to make royalty payments after the U.S. company announced its intention to acquire Nokia’s handset business in September 2013.The lawsuit claimed Samsung still owed $6.9 million in interest on more than $1 billion in patent royalties it delayed paying. Samsung has countered that the Nokia acquisition violated its 2011 collaboration deal with Microsoft. In 2011 a technology analyst at Citigroup estimated that Microsoft was getting $5 per Android handset sold by phone maker HTC under a patent agreement, and that Microsoft was looking for up to $12.50 per phone from other handset makers it had yet to come to an agreement with. Microsoft has never confirmed those figures, but neither has it said publicly that the estimates were out of line. To apply the $5 price to Samsung, the Korean company could be paying Microsoft about $1.6 billion per year, based on Samsung’s sales of 318 million smartphones in 2014, according to IDC shipment numbers.Samsung said it had agreed in 2011 to pay Microsoft royalties in exchange for a patent license covering phones that ran Google Inc’s Android operating system. Samsung also agreed to develop Windows phones and share confidential business information with Microsoft, according to court filings.Once Microsoft acquired Nokia, it became a direct hardware competitor with Samsung, the filings said, and Samsung refused to share some sensitive information because of antitrust concerns.Antitrust regulators in the United States and other countries approved the Nokia acquisition.The settlement on Monday also ends Samsung’s request for arbitration with the Hong Kong office of the International Court of Arbitration of the International Chamber of Commerce. (Additional reporting by Bill Rigby in Seattle; Editing by Phil Berlowitz and Grant McCool)
Source: Newsjyoti Tech

Microsoft, Samsung settle contract dispute over patents

Microsoft Corp Chief Executive Satya Nadella speaks at his first annual shareholders’ meeting in Bellevue, Washington December 3, 2014.
Credit: Reuters/Jason Redmond

(Reuters) – Microsoft and Samsung Electronics Co Ltd have settled a contract dispute over patent royalties, though terms of the settlement are confidential, Microsoft said in a statement on Monday.
Microsoft sued Samsung last year in a federal court in New York, accusing Samsung of breaching a collaboration agreement by initially refusing to make royalty payments after the U.S. company announced its intention to acquire Nokia’s handset business in September 2013.The lawsuit claimed Samsung still owed $6.9 million in interest on more than $1 billion in patent royalties it delayed paying. Samsung has countered that the Nokia acquisition violated its 2011 collaboration deal with Microsoft. In 2011 a technology analyst at Citigroup estimated that Microsoft was getting $5 per Android handset sold by phone maker HTC under a patent agreement, and that Microsoft was looking for up to $12.50 per phone from other handset makers it had yet to come to an agreement with. Microsoft has never confirmed those figures, but neither has it said publicly that the estimates were out of line. To apply the $5 price to Samsung, the Korean company could be paying Microsoft about $1.6 billion per year, based on Samsung’s sales of 318 million smartphones in 2014, according to IDC shipment numbers.Samsung said it had agreed in 2011 to pay Microsoft royalties in exchange for a patent license covering phones that ran Google Inc’s Android operating system. Samsung also agreed to develop Windows phones and share confidential business information with Microsoft, according to court filings.Once Microsoft acquired Nokia, it became a direct hardware competitor with Samsung, the filings said, and Samsung refused to share some sensitive information because of antitrust concerns.Antitrust regulators in the United States and other countries approved the Nokia acquisition.The settlement on Monday also ends Samsung’s request for arbitration with the Hong Kong office of the International Court of Arbitration of the International Chamber of Commerce. (Additional reporting by Bill Rigby in Seattle; Editing by Phil Berlowitz and Grant McCool)
Source: Newsjyoti Tech

Levy Acquisition Corp in the lead to acquire Del Taco -sources

<span class=”articleLocation”>Feb 9 (Reuters) – Levy Acquisition Corp, the
blank-check acquisition vehicle of Chicago restaurateur Larry
Levy, is in advanced talks to acquire Del Taco Inc, a U.S. fast
food chain specializing in Mexican cuisine, according to people
familiar with the matter.
Levy is negotiating a deal that could value Del Taco at as
much as $500 million, including debt, the people said this week.
The acquisition vehicle needs to secure financing for the deal,
and it is possible the talks could end without an agreement, the
people added.The sources asked not to be identified because the matter is
confidential. Del Taco and Levy Acquisition representatives did
not respond to requests for comment.Founded in 1964, Lake Forest, California-based Del Taco owns
and operates 560 restaurants in 16 U.S. states serving Mexican
cuisine and American favorites such as burgers and fries.The majority of Del Taco’s locations are in West Coast
states including California and Oregon. Del Taco serves more
than three million customers each week.Del Taco is owned by a consortium of private equity firms
that include Goldman Sachs Mezzanine Partners, Charlesbank
Capital Partners and Leonard Green & Partners LP.Del Taco is one of a number of restaurant chains trying to
sell themselves or go public as market valuations for the sector
continue to hold strong.Burger chain Shake Shack Inc saw its shares more
than double the day of its initial public offering last month.Levy is the co-founder of Levy Restaurants, which operates
concession stands at arenas including Wrigley Field and U.S.
Cellular Park and owns well-known Chicago restaurants like
Spiaggia, which is regarded as one of President Obama’s favorite
restaurants in the city.Levy Acquisition Corp raised $150 million in an IPO in 2013.

(Reporting by Olivia Oran in New York)
Source: Newsjyoti Company News

The fat fight: Study fuels row over UK, U.S. diet guidelines

Nutrition and health specialists criticised a study on Monday which argued that dietary fat advice given in the United States and Britain was based on flimsy evidence and should not have been introduced.
The study, published in the Open Heart journal, said national advice on fat consumption issued to millions of Britons and Americans in 1977 and 1983 with the aim of reducing heart disease “lacked any solid trial evidence to back it up”.But in the latest chapter of a long-running row about whether fat is the true culprit in the global obesity epidemic, independent experts said the research was flawed and failed “to take into account the totality of the evidence”.Both the British and U.S. dietary guidelines recommended reducing overall dietary fat consumption to 30 percent of total intake and limiting saturated fat to around 10 percent — advice that has remained broadly the same since the 1970s and 1980s.Zoe Harcombe of the University of the West of Scotland and James DiNicolantonio of the Saint Luke’s Mid America Heart Institute, who co-led Monday’s study in the Open Heart journal, said their research — a meta-analysis of the randomised controlled trials available at the time — suggested the guidelines were inconsistent with the evidence.”The available [trials] did not support the introduction of dietary fat recommendations in order to reduce [coronary heart disease] risk or related mortality,” they wrote, adding that it seemed “incomprehensible” that dietary advice was given to millions of Americans and Britons given the “contrary results”.Health experts looking for clues to persistently rising obesity rates around the world have recently begun to question whether fat is the main, or only, villain, and many are turning a spotlight on sugars and other carbohydrates instead. Yet several independent experts asked to review Harcombe’s and DiNicolantonio’s work criticised the study’s approach and advised extreme caution in concluding the guidelines were wrong.”The claim that guidelines on dietary fat introduced in the 1970s and 80s were not based on good scientific evidence is misguided and potentially dangerous,” said Christine Williams, a professor of human nutrition at Britain’s Reading University.Nita Forouhi, a nutritional epidemiology specialist and public health consultant at Britain’s Cambridge University said the Open Heart study’s attempt to apply a “retroscope” to the trial-based evidence of the time was “unhelpful for several reasons, including methodological limitations and interpretation”.”As such, the current dietary guidelines on fat intake should not be influenced by this study,” she said. (Editing by Robin Pomeroy)
Source: Newsjyoti Health

The fat fight: Study fuels row over UK, U.S. diet guidelines

Nutrition and health specialists criticised a study on Monday which argued that dietary fat advice given in the United States and Britain was based on flimsy evidence and should not have been introduced.
The study, published in the Open Heart journal, said national advice on fat consumption issued to millions of Britons and Americans in 1977 and 1983 with the aim of reducing heart disease “lacked any solid trial evidence to back it up”.But in the latest chapter of a long-running row about whether fat is the true culprit in the global obesity epidemic, independent experts said the research was flawed and failed “to take into account the totality of the evidence”.Both the British and U.S. dietary guidelines recommended reducing overall dietary fat consumption to 30 percent of total intake and limiting saturated fat to around 10 percent — advice that has remained broadly the same since the 1970s and 1980s.Zoe Harcombe of the University of the West of Scotland and James DiNicolantonio of the Saint Luke’s Mid America Heart Institute, who co-led Monday’s study in the Open Heart journal, said their research — a meta-analysis of the randomised controlled trials available at the time — suggested the guidelines were inconsistent with the evidence.”The available [trials] did not support the introduction of dietary fat recommendations in order to reduce [coronary heart disease] risk or related mortality,” they wrote, adding that it seemed “incomprehensible” that dietary advice was given to millions of Americans and Britons given the “contrary results”.Health experts looking for clues to persistently rising obesity rates around the world have recently begun to question whether fat is the main, or only, villain, and many are turning a spotlight on sugars and other carbohydrates instead. Yet several independent experts asked to review Harcombe’s and DiNicolantonio’s work criticised the study’s approach and advised extreme caution in concluding the guidelines were wrong.”The claim that guidelines on dietary fat introduced in the 1970s and 80s were not based on good scientific evidence is misguided and potentially dangerous,” said Christine Williams, a professor of human nutrition at Britain’s Reading University.Nita Forouhi, a nutritional epidemiology specialist and public health consultant at Britain’s Cambridge University said the Open Heart study’s attempt to apply a “retroscope” to the trial-based evidence of the time was “unhelpful for several reasons, including methodological limitations and interpretation”.”As such, the current dietary guidelines on fat intake should not be influenced by this study,” she said. (Editing by Robin Pomeroy)
Source: Newsjyoti Lifestyle

Netanyahu considering changes to Congress speech after criticism

Israeli’s Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu attends the weekly cabinet meeting in his office in Jerusalem February 8, 2015.
Credit: Reuters/Sebastian Scheiner/Pool

(Reuters) – Israeli officials are considering amending the format of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s planned address to the U.S. Congress next month to try to calm some of the partisan furore the Iran-focused speech has provoked.
Netanyahu is due to address a joint session of Congress about Iran’s nuclear programme on March 3, just two weeks before Israeli elections, following an invitation from John Boehner, the Republican speaker of the house.Boehner’s invitation has caused consternation in both Israel and the United States, largely because it is seen as Netanyahu, a hawk on Iran, working with the Republicans to thumb their noses at President Barack Obama’s policy on Iran. It is also seen as putting Netanyahu’s political links to the Republicans ahead of Israel’s nation-to-nation ties with the United States, its strongest and most important ally, while serving as a pre-election campaign booster.As a result, Israeli officials are considering whether Netanyahu should speak to a closed-door session of Congress, rather than in a prime-time TV address, so as to drain some of the intensity from the event, a source said.Another option is for the prime minister to make his speech at the annual meeting of the American Israel Public Affairs Committee in Washington the same week, rather than in Congress. “The issue has been under discussion for a week,” said a source close to the prime minister’s office. “(Netanyahu) is discussing it with Likud people. Some say he should give up on the speech, others that he should go through with it.”But Netanyahu told voters from the Russian speaking community on Monday evening that he was determined to discuss Israel’s objections in Washington to an emerging deal with Iran but he did not say if that meant a public speech in Congress.”I am … determined to go to Washington to present Israel’s position to the members of Congress and the American people,” Netanyahu said, repeating that nuclear weapons in Iran’s hands would constitute an existential threat to Israel. An opinion poll by Israel’s Army Radio on Monday said 47 percent of people think Netanyahu should cancel the address, while 34 percent say he should go ahead with it.Since the issue arose, there are signs it is having an impact on his poll ratings ahead of the March 17 election.Obama said his decision not to meet with Netanyahu followed basic protocol of not meeting with world leaders before an election.”Some of this just has to do with how we do business, and I think it’s important for us to maintain these protocols because the U.S.-Israeli relationship is not about a particular party,” Obama said at a joint news conference with German Chancellor Angela Merkel in Washington. A poll by the Times of Israel on Monday said Netanyahu’s Likud would win 23 seats in the 120-seat Knesset, four fewer than the centre-left opposition. Earlier polls showed Likud and the opposition alliance neck-and-neck on 24 seats. Speaking on radio last week, Israel’s deputy foreign minister suggested Netanyahu had been “misled” about the speech, believing it to be bipartisan when the Democrats were not entirely on board.While that may have created some room for Netanyahu to get out of it if the pressure at home and from Washington becomes too great, it may be too late.If he withdraws now it may make him look weak with core voters. Furthermore, he needs an opportunity to play up his tough-on-Iran credentials before election, with national security an overriding issue for voters. (Writing by Luke Baker; editing by Ralph Boulton)
Source: Newsjyoti Politics

IBM sues Priceline for patent infringement in U.S. court

A man passes by an illuminated IBM logo at the CeBIT computer fair in Hanover February 27, 2011.
Credit: Reuters/Tobias Schwarz

(Reuters) – IBM filed a lawsuit against Priceline Group Inc on Monday, accusing it of infringing four IBM patents in running its travel and dining websites.
International Business Machines Corp asked the U.S. District Court for the District of Delaware to bar Priceline from using the patents, to award IBM royalties and to order Priceline to pay IBM’s costs and attorney’s fees. IBM also said that the infringement was willful, and asked for all damages to be trebled.IBM said it had approached Priceline about the alleged infringement.”Despite IBM’s repeated demands, Priceline refuses to negotiate a license. This lawsuit seeks to stop Priceline from continuing to use IBM’s intellectual property without authorization,” IBM said in its complaint.Two of the IBM patents are from the late 1990s, one which tracks prior conversations with a user and another which speeds Internet transmissions. The third patent is from 2006 and is a method of showing Internet advertising; a fourth from 2009 improves on a single sign-on.Priceline also used the patented technology on its websites kayak.com and opentable.com, IBM alleged.Priceline was not immediately available for comment.The case is at the U.S. District Court for the District of Delaware. It is International Business Machines Corp v. The Priceline Group Inc, and is No. 15-00137. (Reporting by Diane Bartz; Editing by Lisa Shumaker)
Source: Newsjyoti Tech

Canada's Uni-Select to sell U.S. auto parts distribution business

Source: Newsjyoti Company News

Oregon attorney general opens probe into Governor Kitzhaber

Oregon Governor John Kitzhaber attends a prayer vigil after a shooting at Reynolds High School in Troutdale, Oregon June 10, 2014.
Credit: Reuters/Steve Dipaola

(Reuters) – Oregon’s attorney general is investigating allegations surrounding Governor John Kitzhaber and his fiancée about a potential conflict of interest between her role in the governor’s office and her private consulting business. 
Democrat Kitzhaber, in a letter dated Monday, asked Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum, also a Democrat, to investigate the matter. The attorney general responded that a probe was already under way.”My office has already opened an investigation into this matter. I appreciate your intent to fully cooperate,” Rosenblum said in a letter to the governor. Kitzhaber, who was re-elected to an unprecedented fourth term in November, has been dogged for months by mounting allegations that fiancée Cylvia Hayes used her role in his office for personal gain. It was not immediately clear when Rosenblum, who last week characterized the allegations against the governor as troubling, had opened the investigation. Neither her office nor the governor’s would respond beyond the letters. The probe by the attorney general’s office appeared to be in addition to a review by the state’s ethics commission of whether Hayes’ acceptance of consulting contracts may have violated state ethics rules.  The state’s flagship newspaper, The Oregonian, last week called on Kitzhaber, whom it had endorsed for re-election last year, to resign. Kitzhaber has said he has no plans to step down, and promised to cooperate with the attorney general’s probe.”I deeply regret that this situation has become a distraction from the important work of our state and look forward to your review and its conclusions,” he said in the letter. Adding to woes facing the governor, media reports last week revealed that Hayes received $118,000 in previously undisclosed consulting fees in 2011 and 2012 from the Washington-based Clean Economy Development Center while advising the governor on energy policy.Kitzhaber did not disclose Hayes’ income from the Clean Economy group on his annual economic interest statements despite disclosing other fees she had received via consulting contracts. He has said the couple did not see it as a potential conflict of interest and therefore did not feel it had to be reported.He recently announced Hayes will no longer have a policy role in his office.  (Editing by Cynthia Johnston and Eric Walsh)
Source: Newsjyoti Politics

After heart attack, women more stressed than men

Young women report more stress than men soon after a heart attack, which may explain their worse recovery, according to a new study.
“It has been known for a while that (the) mortality rate is higher in younger women than in younger men after heart attack,” said lead author Xiao Xu, assistant professor of obstetrics, gynecology and reproductive sciences at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut.But few studies have looked at gender differences in other outcomes, Xu told Reuters Health by email. “Women tend to experience greater stress than men, even in the general population regardless of heart attack status,” she said. “Our study confirmed such a gender difference in young and middle-aged patients with heart attack.”The researchers compared 2,397 women and 1,175 men under age 55 who were hospitalized in the U.S., Spain or Australia with a heart attack. The severity of the heart attacks was similar for women and men.While hospitalized, participants answered 14 questions about their recent stress levels. One month later, researchers re-interviewed them and assessed their recovery.At the first interview, those who were younger and female tended to have higher stress scores than those who were older or male, the authors reported in a paper scheduled for publication in the journal Circulation. On the 0- to 56-point stress scale, men averaged 23.4 points and women averaged 27 points.A third of women had experienced major family conflict within the past year compared to 20 percent of men. More women than men also reported a major personal injury, illness or death of a family member over the past year.Women tend to have lower financial resources than men and are often faced with more demands for family care, which may explain their higher stress, Xu said.Women in the study also had more diabetes, lung disease, kidney problems, depression, cancer and previous heart problems.At the one-month point, women had worse chest-pain related physical function, quality of life and overall health.“We had known that women have worse health status after a heart attack for some time,” said Dr. Suzanne V. Arnold, a research assistant professor at the University of Missouri in Kansas City. “What we don’t really understand is why.”Arnold, who was not involved in the new study, noted that people who have more issues with their health and personal lives also experience more stress, and in this study, the women tended to have more of both.Stress is associated with heart attack and even death, Arnold said.“However, stress is associated with so many other things – including smoking, lack of exercise, comorbidities, etc. – that are also strong risk factors for heart attack,” so stress was probably not the main cause of most of the heart attacks, she said. After a heart attack, patients are often advised to adopt healthy lifestyles and receive therapies such as beta-blockers, but people under more stress may be less likely to comply, Xu said. Stressed people are more likely to engage in smoking and drinking behaviors or have disruptions in their treatment regimen, she said. “When caring for younger patients with heart attack, especially younger women patients, we should look beyond their physical health and pay attention to their psychosocial status as well,” Xu said. “Although our study demonstrated a strong relationship between higher mental stress and worse recovery, we cannot make causal inferences,” she said. “We still need more research to understand the exact mechanisms through which mental stress operates to affect recovery.”All heart attack patients, regardless of gender, should be screened for chronic stress, Arnold said.“I think this research highlights again the importance of recognizing and addressing the level of perceived stress of heart attack patients,” she said. “I don’t think men or women should be treated differently, as any ‘intervention’ for stress would need to be customized for the individual patient and his or her psychosocial needs.”SOURCE: bit.ly/1q3uqj1 Circulation, online February 9, 2015.
Source: Newsjyoti Health